Can AI improve your presentation skills?

By | January 11th, 2022|Blog, Communication, Performance, Presentation skills|

Our Head of Coaching, Nicola Hainey, reviews Microsoft Powerpoint’s new feature: Presenter Coach.

An AI tool to help rehearse presentations? In honesty, we were slightly sceptical. However, having reviewed Microsoft’s new Presenter Coach in Powerpoint, we do think this tool could have some value to us and our clients.

How does it work?

When ready to rehearse your Powerpoint slides, under the ‘slide show’ tab, there is the option to ‘rehearse with coach’. Once clicked, it launches your slideshow and monitors how you present giving you live feedback as well as a summary report once you’ve finished presenting.

Here’s what we liked about the tool:

Firstly, it’s intuitive and easy to use with clear feedback.

Secondly, the sheer range of what the tool monitors is impressive. This tool will tell you if:

• You’re going too fast or slow – benchmarked against an optimal rate of 100 – 165 words per minute
• You’re using too many filler words (ums, errs, like etc)
• You’re sounding monotonous and not varying your pitch enough
• If you repeat a word too often – examples being ‘basically’, ‘nevertheless’, ‘technically’
• Your body language/visual appearance is not supporting your presentation – e.g., you’re not looking into the camera enough or if how you dress or your background is distracting
• You swear or use culturally ‘insensitive phrases’ – e.g., suggestion to use ‘police officers’ instead of ‘policemen’
• There are words you are mispronouncing

Lastly, it’s pretty accurate! We agreed with its findings and also the recommendations for improvements.

A few limitations of the tool:

The live feedback mechanism is distracting and although it offers useful information, it almost certainly interrupts your flow as you stop to read the comments which pop up on screen. It should only be used for rehearsing though and never during live presentations. The irony that even ‘you’re doing great, keep going’ can cause you to stumble!

Moreover, the advice can only take you so far. The problems that the tool identifies are often quite hard to fix. Changing your presentation speed or getting rid of filler sounds can take some sustained and targeted work. The danger is that people can identify what is wrong but not know how to fix it.

Our verdict

This tool is useful in identifying blind spots in our presentation style and offers some potential quick fixes. However, much of what is diagnosed would still require tailored and focused work, ideally with a trained communications professional to improve. Much like an initial consultation when you’ve hurt your back, the diagnosis is essential but it’s the subsequent physiotherapy that makes the sustained difference. So, from our perspective, we’re not out of a job yet! We are however, excited about using this tool to help our clients measure their progress over the course of their coaching sessions with us.

We would be interested to hear your thoughts on the Presenter Coach so do let us know.

Christmas and the Rule of Three

By | December 16th, 2021|Communication, Pitching, Presentation skills, Storytelling|

There’s a hilarious home video of a Nativity play in an English village church. It usually goes viral at this time of year. A four-year-old girl doesn’t so much sing as bellow her way through ‘The Virgin Mary had a Baby Boy’. The girl, now 29 (where did the time go?!), was interviewed on Radio 3 this morning. She called her performance, in which she plays Angel No. 3, ‘3 minutes of embarrassment’.

Radio 3 – Angel 3 – 3 minutes… the radio interview added yet more threes to my (long) Christmas list! Elsewhere in the Nativity, three ‘kings of Orient’ bring three gifts to honour the baby Jesus. ‘What shall I give him?’ wonders the narrator of ‘In the Bleak Midwinter’. I am neither (1) a shepherd nor (2) a wise man but (3) I can give my heart. Another narrator saw ‘three ships come sailing in’ – a possible reference to the coat of arms of King Wenceslas II. It was a different Good King Wenceslas whose snow lay (1) deep and (2) crisp and (3) even. ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas’, we sing three times before adding ‘and a Happy New Year’! The traditional coin stirred into the Christmas pudding was the silver threepence. Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, one of the most famous Christmas stories of all, tells of the three ghosts that visit Ebenezer Scrooge…

I could go on, but you get the idea!

There is something about a pattern of three that has a particular power over us. The Rule of Three is everywhere, not just at Christmas, but across every sphere of human thought, from music and folklore to physics, philosophy and art. For most of human history, we have been an oral species. If we wanted people to remember what we told them, we arranged our stories, proverbs and slogans into threes. For the human brain, three truly is a magic number.

Channel that magic! At MSB Executive, this one of our central pieces of advice to clients who want to increase the impact of their presentations. If you want to grab your audience’s attention, keep them engaged, and lodge your key messages in their minds, then develop the habit of organising your ideas into patterns of three.

There are many different ways of doing so. Divide a topic under three headings. Use three bulletpoints on a slide. Illustrate an abstract point using three pieces of real-world data, or a trend using three metrics. Highlight your three most important challenges, opportunities or objectives. Tell a story in three sections (past/present/future or villain/victim/hero, for example.)

We at MSB Executive strive to practise what we preach. The Rule of Three is an important structural principle in our work, too. We pride ourselves on giving our clients practical, manageable and memorable tips and tools for great communication. What better way to back up this claim than by arranging our key topics into threes? We have the three-step answer, three stages for getting nerves under control, three bridging techniques, and a great many more triples besides.

If you’d like to find out more about our coaching, training and workshops, please get in touch with us. For now, though, from the three of us and all our associates, we wish you and your loved ones a peaceful, restful and happy end to the year. And if you’re awake in the very early hours of Christmas morning, why not step outside and look up into the starry sky? If you’re lucky, you might just hear the most festive three of all: ‘Ho, ho, ho!’

(And for the curious, here’s that video.)

The End of the Back-to-Back Day?

By | October 26th, 2021|Communication, Online meetings|

We all know that sinking feeling when we’ve started the day off positively, only to open our diaries and see a flurry of colour blocks demanding every second of our day to be spent in front of our computers on calls.

We see this frustration often at MSB during our programmes of 1:1 coaching sessions in the corporate world. There is rarely a person that doesn’t need some support to reclaim their diaries. We share tips and techniques on ringfencing time for yourself, prioritising what is really important and how to say no to requests that are urgent for others but not for you.

Many organisations are trying their own methods of changing the ‘tyranny of meetings’ culture. These include meetings ending at 25 or 55 past the hour or starting at 10 past the hour to ensure people get breaks. Companies such as Facebook, Asana and Shopify have company-wide ‘no meetings allowed’ days.

BUT could a new type of communications technology drastically change how we conduct meetings?

We like to keep our finger on the pulse at MSB. We’ve noticed a new app on the horizon called Katch which is a heavily backed start-up with high expectations to ‘blow up’ the way we use calendars currently for meetings.

The way it works is that instead of booking a meeting slot in people’s diaries, you send them a ‘card’ in the Katch app with the topic of conversation. Both parties can assign a priority rating for the conversation, and you are only contactable when you switch your status to available.

 

So instead of having a full day of meetings that may or may not be relevant to your top priority items, the idea is that you bash out shorter, more productive and timely conversations in moments that work for you. Plus when you are ‘unavailable’, you have time to focus on your own strategic work. It’s a concept designed to put you back in charge of your day in a more effective way.

Could it really work?

In theory it’s a concept that could instigate a complete mindset shift regarding how people interact at work, and it therefore has the power to change behaviours. History reveals time and again how sceptics were proved wrong over how an app or piece of technology changes behaviours and even society – Uber, Deliveroo, Whatsapp. So who knows what this little app could do?

We do have some questions:  what’s to stop this new piece of tech getting clogged with requests and becoming yet another channel we need to monitor alongside calendars, emails, Whatsapp, Slack, Instant Messenger, Teams etc? Won’t a friend or colleague  be offended or annoyed if you deprioritise their conversation request? If someone senior sends a conversation card, how easy would it be to refuse?

But ever the hopeful optimists here at MSB Executive, we’d love to see this app take off and put people back in control of their own time – making them happier and more productive.

What do you think?

Nerves and ‘Fight or Flight’

By | May 26th, 2021|Body Language, Communication, Nerves, Performance, Presentation skills, Public speaking|

In his latest blog, Head of Voice Steven Maddocks looks at the science of nerves to explain why they affect us in the way they do.

Lisa’s heart is racing. Her breathing is rapid and shallow. Her armpits are sweating, her hands are clammy, and her neck and face are red. Her legs are jittery, her mouth is dry and her teeth are clenched. Her brain is alternately racing, then going blank. She has pins and needles in her stomach, and she feels sick. She needs the toilet. Is Lisa ill? Is she dying?

No. She is on stage, about to deliver a workshop to two hundred senior industry figures. Lisa is nervous.

The Source of Nerves

As trained actors and performers, we at MSB Executive are familiar with pre-performance anxiety. Our clients often ask us for advice on the issue. We think it is important to understand what is going on in the body. Why do nerves put us, like Lisa, into such a calamitous state? The situation is not so serious. Lisa’s extreme response does not seem logical.

Indeed! Responsibility lies with a very illogical part of the brain called the amygdala. Located deep within the limbic system, it belongs to what Steve Peters calls the chimp brain (The Chimp Paradox, Vermillion, 2021). Lisa’s amygdala has detected a threatening situation and switched Lisa into ‘fight or flight’ mode. There is no nuance; for the chimp, every threat is a mortal threat.

Mortal Danger

Lisa’s body is behaving as though there is a snarling tiger a few metres away. Her adrenal glands are unloading adrenaline, cortisol and norepinephrine into her blood. These hormones are racing around her body, delivering instructions.

Her digestive system has been issued a shutdown order: the blood it uses is needed in her muscles. As the capillaries in her gut give up their blood, she feels a fluttering sensation – the butterflies. The digestive shutdown – which is giving her the urge to throw up or go to the toilet – extends all the way up into her mouth, which has stopped producing saliva. Her jaw has clamped shut. (Has the tiger seen her? She mustn’t make a noise.)

Lisa is breathing rapidly to take in oxygen, and her heart is furiously pumping the oxygenated blood. The large muscles in her legs twitch as they receive the extra supply. She is heating up (blood is hot), and her sweat glands have kicked in to cool her down.

Lisa’s amygdala wants her hyper-alert, so her brain also gets extra blood. The capillaries in her neck and face dilate: that’s why she’s blushing. She hops from idea to idea, trying quickly to make a plan. Fight or flight? Only those thoughts are permitted; if she attempts to think analytically or self-reflectively, she draws a blank.

Getting Control

Lisa’s workshop starts in two minutes! She needs to make a big impact with her opening words. How does she switch off her amygdala? She can’t close capillaries, seal up sweat glands, or reboot her gut. Is she trapped in fight or flight?

Good news for Lisa: she has worked with MSB Executive, so she has plenty of tools for dealing with nerves. Her favourite technique is to take a few slower and deeper breaths. As soon as she does that, her heart rate slows, her temperature drops and the butterflies ease.

In the words of breathing guru Stuart Sandeman, the Founder of Breathpod, ‘Calm your breath, and your mind will follow.’ It is true: by breathing better, Lisa feels as though she is soothing her inner chimp: ‘Sssh,’ she tells it. ‘It’s only a workshop. Everything will be fine.’

The workshop was fine – better than fine, in fact. It went so well that Lisa was invited to deliver it the following year as the keynote speaker at a prestigious international conference.

Feeling Nervous? – Good!

By | May 6th, 2021|Communication, Nerves, Presentation skills, Public speaking|

In his latest blog, Steven Maddocks, our Head of Voice Coaching, explores the upside of nerves and shows how public speaking might even be good for your health.

Public speaking gets a bad rap. One well-known poll places glossophobia, the fear of public speaking, at the top – making it a more terrifying prospect than spiders, enclosed spaces and even dying. (As Jerry Seinfeld wryly observed, at a funeral, most people would rather be in the coffin than giving the eulogy.)

Many of our clients at MSB Executive report feeling nervous – in some cases, very nervous – before speaking to an audience. We are commonly asked for advice on ‘combatting’ or ‘getting rid of’ nerves. Our response takes people by surprise: we tell them, ‘Don’t try to combat your nerves. This is the wrong approach. Your nerves are important!’

If combat is the wrong approach, what is the right one? Our answer to this question involves three stages: understand, manage and appreciate.

First, understand that nerves are a fight-or-flight response trigged by a situation of extreme danger. Or rather, triggered when the brain perceives a situation of extreme danger. Because in the case of public speaking, the brain has got it wrong! You are not on the savannah facing a sabre-toothed tiger. You are in the fourth-floor conference room facing your colleagues in HR. The nausea, the blushing, the sweaty palms – these are all vastly disproportionate to the situation at hand. Don’t let your body fool you into thinking this is life or death.

The second stage is to manage nerves. We have plenty of tips and techniques for managing the dry mouth, knocking knees, racing mind and other symptoms of nerves that threaten to derail a speech or presentation.

When we come to the third stage – appreciate your nerves – we are able to draw on our performance training and experience. Nerves are a fact of life for actors: we depend on them. Feeling nervous before a show gets us in the game. Judi Dench describes nerves as ‘an actor’s fuel.’ We know how to put our nervous energy to good use by channeling it into our performance. That’s what gives good actors their unmistakable fizz and stage presence. At MSB Executive, we show our clients how nervous energy, properly managed, can power a business presentation in the same way.

After a successful presentation – particularly if we were very nervous beforehand – we feel a buzz, that post-performance euphoria when we know we ‘knocked it out of the park’. This is partly rational: we take satisfaction in having mastered a challenge. But a recent scientific study suggests that there is something deeper going on. The buzz could in fact be a direct consequence of having felt nervous beforehand. The study in question placed its subject into a situation of stress for a short time and then took blood tests at intervals. The remarkable finding was that soon after feeling stress, the subject’s body was flooded with white blood cells. The stress had actually boosted the immune system.

If you think back to the savannah, this makes perfect sense. If the tiger takes a bite but doesn’t kill you, your body needs to be primed to fight off infection and heal. The immune system needs a boost.

Though ongoing stress is bad for us, the study suggests that we should embrace brief bouts of stress. Perhaps we should take a thrill-seeker’s approach to public speaking. Next time the nerves strike, remind yourself of the health benefits. Public speaking could save your life!

Top Tips For Setting Up A Webinar

By | February 4th, 2021|Communication, Online meetings, Online video, Performance, Presentation skills, Public speaking|

There were a couple of questions at the CFA UK webinar I ran yesterday (03/02/2021) about how I managed my set up for the webinar. In particular people wanted to know about how I kept eye contact with the camera while using notes. Here is a photo of my set up. You will see:

  • The platform on my desk allows me to stand up while presenting. This is useful for longer presentations. It helps the voice sound more authoritative and the body language to be more expressive.
  • Camera above the screen. Most importantly it is at eye level.
  • Notes above the camera. This has some key words or phrases to keep me on track. I don’t need to look far from the camera to check what comes next.
  • Notes at bottom of the screen. If I need to read the notes in more detail looking down for a few moments is better than looking up or to the side.
  • LED ring light: balances the natural light from my window on the right.
  • Split screens: the lap top has the videos and the small number of slides that I used ready so I can make sure everything is correct before sharing the screen.
  • Cup of tea: essential.

Do get in touch of you have any questions about getting the right set up for your online meetings and presentations.

Why not set a communication resolution this year?

By | January 27th, 2021|Communication, Online meetings, Presentation skills, Public speaking, Video|

Feeling disheartened already setting new year’s resolutions? We understand. 2020 was an unbelievably challenging year. There is still so much uncertainty around what options will be available to us in 2021 which can make setting resolutions tricky. We can’t necessarily join that choir or take that trip we wanted to.

At MSB Executive we’ve been thinking about is how we can scale down resolutions to make them more manageable and meaningful. Our team has therefore decided to focus on our communication skills and what are the small things each of us could commit to improving? Having a bit of focus gives purpose and a feeling of achievement.

Here are some of the team’s individual communication resolutions to inspire you to think of your own:

Embracing the pause

Too often we can rush in to talk and fill a silence. It can lead to ‘filler’ sounds such as ‘umms and ahhs’. Practicing pauses and getting comfortable with silence is a great habit to develop.

Prioritising listening over talking

Regularly choosing to pay complete attention to someone without the intention of speaking at all until asked. Our team member has put a post-it note on their screen which says ‘shhhhhh and listen’ to remind themselves.

Remembering to SMILE at the start of calls/presentations

It’s too easy to get into our heads about the content of our presentation rather than remembering that when we smile – not only do we relax but we visually demonstrate to the audience that we are relaxed and happy to be there…so they can relax to.

Speaking directly

Omitting the ‘just’ out of communications e.g. ‘I was just wondering if…’ ‘I’m just getting in touch to see…’. It’s an easy habit to get into but it subtly diminishes your own importance. It’s ok to ‘wonder’ or ‘get in touch’ without tip-toeing.

 

We hope this inspires you to think about your own communication habits and pick something of your own to work on. Let us know what you might work on and we’d love to give you more tips!

5 ways 2020 has changed how we communicate

By | January 5th, 2021|Blog, Body Language, Communication, Online meetings, Online video|

The impact of Covid 19 transformed the world as we knew it last year. We have been reflecting on what this has meant for the way we communicate as humans. It feels that we have adapted from age-old, ingrained, means of communication to entirely different norms in a rapid period.

Here are 5 ways 2020 changed how we communicate:

1. A window into your home

‘Dress to impress’ was the adage pre-2020 to remind us that people judge the visual as much as our content in communicating. Now we must think one step further thanks to the rise in video calls. We need to ‘window dress’ our backgrounds as every video call allows a little window into our homes. This is all the more obvious when we see reporters, journalists and interviewees in their homes on TV news – sometimes it’s hard to believe that they haven’t thought more about their backgrounds because whether we like it or not, this gets judged as much as we ourselves do.

2. Interpreting communications through a mask

So much of how we communicate is nuanced in micro facial expressions but for much of this year we’ve been communicating with each other through a mask. It means that we need to work harder with both our words and our tone of voice to convey more explicitly the sentiment of what we’re saying.

3. New language adopted instantaneously

New terminology has emerged constantly that is suddenly the jargon on everybody’s lips. Furlough, pandemic, Covid, PPE and of course, festive bubbles – which until this year meant something entirely different in previous years!

4. Greetings with elbow bumps

Physical contact is a primal need. Will we return to shaking hands when the world returns to normal? People may take different approaches. Expect some awkward moments when we do go back to some face-to face meetings.

5. Gathering as groups online

Last but not least is of course, the omnipresence of video calls and meetings as working from home became the standard practice. Again, we’ve lost a lot the subtlety that body language brings into communicating. This has led to some bumpy moments on Zoom calls such as speaking over one another or where everyone has their camera turned off and you feel you are speaking into a void!

In summary

We think these changes demonstrate the incredible ability humans have in adapting to their circumstances. It will be interesting to observe in 2021 which of these new habits in communicating we keep or if we’ll revert back to old ways. Or perhaps more likely there will be a combination… transparent face masks anyone?

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